Tag Archives: Virginia Woolf

There’s a Thousand Things I Want to Say to You: The City, Modernism and the Flâneuse

  The passing of the historical figure paved the way for the resurrection of the flâneur as a methodological persona, adopted in order to pursue the exploration of the city. Stripped to its basic characteristics and used as a modus … Continue reading

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‘The Lodger’ by Louisa Treger

Ten minutes into the conversation I realise that the writer my MA supervisor is talking about is the same one I discovered for myself some months before, except she gives Walter Benjamin’s name the full Germanic pronunciation and I realise … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – August 2013

  This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading: ‘Complete Poems’ – Walt Whitman Whitman is often described as the father of American poetry and, indeed, his influence can be traced right through to the beat poets of the 1950s.  … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – June 2013

  This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading:      ‘Cullodon’ – John Prebble Written in 1961 but still the definitive account of the Battle of Culloden.  Prebble sets the battle in its social context and makes liberal use … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – March 2013

This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading:      ‘Selected Essays’ – Virginia Woolf    ‘Rodinsky’s Room’ – Rachel Lichtenstein & Iain Sinclair    ‘Underground’ – Tobias Hill    ‘England All Over’ – Joseph Gallivan    ‘The Great God … Continue reading

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Gender, Truth and Reality: The Short Stories of Katherine Mansfield

  Until relatively recently, women have been noticeable only by their absence from the tradition of Anglo-American high modernism. T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Joseph Conrad, D.H. Lawrence and W.B. Yeats – these are the names which have dominated the English … Continue reading

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Bring Me My Bow

  Pilgrim paths, green roads, drove roads, corpse roads, trods, leys, dykes, drongs, snarns, snickets – say the names of paths out loud and they become a poem or rite – holloways, bostles, shutes, driftways, lichways, ridings, halterpaths, cartways, carneys, … Continue reading

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November 2012

This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading:    ‘To the Lighthouse’ – Virginia Woolf    ‘Kid’ – Simon Armitage    ‘Four Quartets’ – T.S. Eliot    ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’ – Charlotte Perkins Gilman    ‘Dracula’ – Bram Stoker    … Continue reading

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From Streetwalker to Street Walker: The Rise of the Flâneuse

In fact and in fantasy, London had become a contested terrain: new commercial spaces and journalist practices, expanding networks of female philanthropy, and a range of public spectacles . . . enabled workingmen and women of many classes to challenge … Continue reading

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Woolf at the Door 2: Mrs Dalloway’s Inner Flâneur

  In Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway Peter Walsh is the most obvious flâneur character; he is able to wander the streets of London with an abandon even the patrician Clarissa Dalloway cannot manage. In an encounter which in its imagery … Continue reading

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