Tag Archives: Paris

Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London by Lauren Elkin

The flâneuse does exist, whenever we have deviated from the paths laid out for us, lighting out for our own territories. Lauren Elkin is well-qualified to write this book, not only has she lived in Paris, London, New York, Tokyo … Continue reading

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There’s a Thousand Things I Want to Say to You: The City, Modernism and the Flâneuse

  The passing of the historical figure paved the way for the resurrection of the flâneur as a methodological persona, adopted in order to pursue the exploration of the city. Stripped to its basic characteristics and used as a modus … Continue reading

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Baudelaire, Benjamin and the Birth of the Flâneur

  On voit un chiffonnier qui vient, hochant la tête, Butant, et se cognant aux murs comme un poète, Et, sans prendre souci des mouchards, ses sujets, Epanche tout son coeur en glorieux projets. Charles Baudelaire: ‘Le Vin de Chiffonniers’ … Continue reading

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Cléo’s Journey

For me, the most fascinating thing about the film Cléo From 5 to 7 is Cléo’s journey through Paris.  She travels on foot, by bus and in a car, her physical journey seeming to mirror her inner odyssey.  Paris, as … Continue reading

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Film of the Month – April 2012 – Agnès Varda’s Cléo From 5 to 7

Cléo From 5 to 7 is one of the key films of the French New Wave.  Director Agnès Varda sets out to create a cinematic odyssey about our perception of time, with much of the action filmed in real time … Continue reading

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Walter Benjamin and The Arcades Project

In many ways The Arcades Project is Benjamin’s lament for the passing of the flâneur. For Benjamin, the flâneur’s disappearance functions as a symbol for the ravages of capitalism upon metropolitan life.  The changing urban environment was no longer conducive … Continue reading

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