Tag Archives: modernism

There’s a Thousand Things I Want to Say to You: The City, Modernism and the Flâneuse

  The passing of the historical figure paved the way for the resurrection of the flâneur as a methodological persona, adopted in order to pursue the exploration of the city. Stripped to its basic characteristics and used as a modus … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – October 2015

This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading: Stuart Braun – City of Exiles (2015) Read my extended review of this book  at minor literature[s]           Simon Foxell – Mapping London: Making Sense of the City (2007) … Continue reading

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‘The Lodger’ by Louisa Treger

Ten minutes into the conversation I realise that the writer my MA supervisor is talking about is the same one I discovered for myself some months before, except she gives Walter Benjamin’s name the full Germanic pronunciation and I realise … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – December 2014

This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading: Liz Berry – ‘Black Country’ (2014) Wench, yowm the colour of ower town: concrete, steel, oily rainbow of the cut. Liz Berry’s poems are intelligent, articulate and profound. They are also, proudly, … Continue reading

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Dorothy Richardson’s ‘The Tunnel’: Feminism and Flânerie in Bloomsbury

  The idea of the flâneur was born in Paris and was first referred to by Baudelaire.  However, London writers have long used the device of the casual wanderer of the capital’s streets, the loiterer, the observer, as a means … Continue reading

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Looking for May

Mary Amelia St. Clair, known as May Sinclair, was born in Rock Ferry, Wirral in 1863.  Her family lived in a house called Thorncote in the prosperous Rock Park suburb and she spent the first seven years of her life … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – August 2013

  This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading: ‘Complete Poems’ – Walt Whitman Whitman is often described as the father of American poetry and, indeed, his influence can be traced right through to the beat poets of the 1950s.  … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – June 2013

  This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading:      ‘Cullodon’ – John Prebble Written in 1961 but still the definitive account of the Battle of Culloden.  Prebble sets the battle in its social context and makes liberal use … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – May 2013

  This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading:    ‘Scarp’ – Nick Papadimitriou Nick Papadimitriou’s meditation on walking, landscape and his upbringing in North London under the shadow of the ridge of land he refers to as Scarp    … Continue reading

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Gender, Truth and Reality: The Short Stories of Katherine Mansfield

  Until relatively recently, women have been noticeable only by their absence from the tradition of Anglo-American high modernism. T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Joseph Conrad, D.H. Lawrence and W.B. Yeats – these are the names which have dominated the English … Continue reading

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