Tag Archives: London

Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – December 2014

This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading: Liz Berry – ‘Black Country’ (2014) Wench, yowm the colour of ower town: concrete, steel, oily rainbow of the cut. Liz Berry’s poems are intelligent, articulate and profound. They are also, proudly, … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – July 2014

This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading: Gordon Honeycombe – ‘Neither the Sea Nor the Sand’ (1971) I first read this book when I was a teenager.  It was probably the heady combination of romantic love and zombies that … Continue reading

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The London Nobody Knows

I first saw this film in a late night television slot in the 1970s. It was made by Norman Cohen in 1968, but rather than presenting yet another montage of ‘swinging’ London and Carnaby Street, his film seemed to capture an older, … Continue reading

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Dorothy Richardson’s ‘The Tunnel’: Feminism and Flânerie in Bloomsbury

  The idea of the flâneur was born in Paris and was first referred to by Baudelaire.  However, London writers have long used the device of the casual wanderer of the capital’s streets, the loiterer, the observer, as a means … Continue reading

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George Gissing: ‘New Grub Street’

George Gissing is, in some ways, a forgotten author.  His subject matter was unrelentingly grim, his world view invariably pessimistic and his work lacked any hint of literary experimentation.  Perhaps, then, one might say he deserves to be forgotten.  But … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – January 2014

  This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading:   John Rogers – ‘This Other London: Adventures in the Overlooked City’ (2013) Ten walks to some of the lesser known parts of London in the ever-engaging company of writer and … Continue reading

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Wild London

Gareth E. Rees, with illustrations by Ada Jusic, Marshland: Dreams and Nightmares on the Edge of London (London, Influx Press, 2013)   In the lower Lea Valley the river carves a border between the modern boroughs of Hackney, Leyton and … Continue reading

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Baudelaire, Benjamin and the Birth of the Flâneur

  On voit un chiffonnier qui vient, hochant la tête, Butant, et se cognant aux murs comme un poète, Et, sans prendre souci des mouchards, ses sujets, Epanche tout son coeur en glorieux projets. Charles Baudelaire: ‘Le Vin de Chiffonniers’ … Continue reading

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Gender, Truth and Reality: The Short Stories of Katherine Mansfield

  Until relatively recently, women have been noticeable only by their absence from the tradition of Anglo-American high modernism. T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Joseph Conrad, D.H. Lawrence and W.B. Yeats – these are the names which have dominated the English … Continue reading

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Daniel Defoe and Psychogeography

Psychogeographic Review is pleased to publish its first guest post, with Joe Clarke championing Daniel Defoe’s role as an early psychogeographer.  All views expressed as those of Joe Clarke.     Defoe’s contribution to the history of psychogeography is twofold. … Continue reading

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