Tag Archives: George Gissing

The City of Dreadful Night

James Thomson was a Scottish-born poet, atheist and anarchist. He struggled with depression, insomnia and alcohol-abuse throughout his short life and his work frequently reflected the bleakness and despair of his life’s experiences. Thomson wrote The Doom of the City … Continue reading

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George Gissing: ‘New Grub Street’

George Gissing is, in some ways, a forgotten author.  His subject matter was unrelentingly grim, his world view invariably pessimistic and his work lacked any hint of literary experimentation.  Perhaps, then, one might say he deserves to be forgotten.  But … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – May 2013

  This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading:    ‘Scarp’ – Nick Papadimitriou Nick Papadimitriou’s meditation on walking, landscape and his upbringing in North London under the shadow of the ridge of land he refers to as Scarp    … Continue reading

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Woolf at the Door 1: The City and Modernism

(Cities were) more than accidental meeting places and crossing points. They were generative environments of the new arts, focal points of intellectual community, indeed of intellectual conflict and tension. (Malcolm Bradbury and James McFarlane (ed), Modernism: A Guide to European … Continue reading

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Book of the Month – April 2012 – George Gissing’s The Nether World

George Gissing is, in many ways, a forgotten author.  His subject matter was unrelentingly grim, his world view invariably pessimistic and his work lacked any hint of literary experimentation.  Perhaps, then, he deserves to be forgotten.  But that would be … Continue reading

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