Tag Archives: feminism

Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – October 2015

This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading: Stuart Braun – City of Exiles (2015) Read my extended review of this book  at minor literature[s]           Simon Foxell – Mapping London: Making Sense of the City (2007) … Continue reading

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Katherine Mansfield’s Olfactory Map of London

  Eight o’clock in the morning.  Miss Ada Moss lay in a black iron bedstead, staring up at the ceiling.  Her room, a Bloomsbury top-floor back, smelled of soot and face powder and the paper of fried potatoes she brought … Continue reading

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Dorothy Richardson’s ‘The Tunnel’: Feminism and Flânerie in Bloomsbury

  The idea of the flâneur was born in Paris and was first referred to by Baudelaire.  However, London writers have long used the device of the casual wanderer of the capital’s streets, the loiterer, the observer, as a means … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – September 2013

This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading: ‘Society of the Spectacle’ – Guy Debord Debord’s use of language in this short book is heavily-laden with Marxist and Hegelian terminology which some readers may find to be a little challenging.  … Continue reading

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Psychogeographic Review’s Recommendations – August 2013

  This past month Psychogeographic Review has been reading: ‘Complete Poems’ – Walt Whitman Whitman is often described as the father of American poetry and, indeed, his influence can be traced right through to the beat poets of the 1950s.  … Continue reading

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Gender, Truth and Reality: The Short Stories of Katherine Mansfield

  Until relatively recently, women have been noticeable only by their absence from the tradition of Anglo-American high modernism. T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Joseph Conrad, D.H. Lawrence and W.B. Yeats – these are the names which have dominated the English … Continue reading

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